New World War Contingency Planning for Individuals – 06-15-14

Viet Minh and Viet Cong Guerillas, like most Guerillas Worldwide, had it right!   ;+)

You need to “blend” into the “occupiers”, but, before “coming back” and “blending”, you need to “get out” of “concentrated areas”, mostly cities, primary and secondary, that are the “first wave targets” to “destabilization” and later “occupation”, without making yourselves “noticeable” in the countryside…….;+)

Some people are already working on it…….;+)

“In the 1960s, the Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara developed the foco (Spanishfoquismo) theory ofrevolution in his book Guerrilla Warfare, based on his experiences during the 1959 Cuban Revolution. This theory was later formalized as “focalism” by Régis Debray. Its central principle is that vanguardism by cadresof small, fast-moving paramilitary groups can provide a focus for popular discontent against a sitting regime, and thereby lead a general insurrection. Although the original approach was to mobilize and launch attacks from rural areas, many foco ideas were adapted into urban guerrilla warfare movements.”

Mao Zedong, during the Chinese Civil War, summarized the People’s Liberation Army‘s principles ofRevolutionary Warfare in the following points for his troops: The enemy advances, we retreat. The enemy camps, we harass. The enemy tires, we attack. The enemy retreats, we pursue. A common slogan of the time went “Draw back your fist before you strike.” This referred to the tactic of baiting the enemy, “drawing back the fist,” before “striking” at the critical moment where they are overstretched and vulnerable. Mao made a distinction between Mobile Warfare (yundong zhan) and Guerrilla Warfare (youji zhan), but they were part of an integrated continuum aiming towards a final objective. Mao’s seminal work, On Guerrilla Warfare, has been widely distributed and applied, successfully in Vietnam, under military leader and theorist Vo Nguyen Giap. Giap’s “Peoples War, Peoples Army” closely follows the Maoist three-stage approach.”

“However, Insurgents may not be seeking to overthrow the state, may have no coherent strategy or may pursue a faith-based approach difficult to counter with traditional methods. There may be numerous competing insurgencies in one theater, meaning that the counterinsurgent must control the overall environment rather than defeat a specific enemy. The actions of individuals and the propaganda effect of a subjective “single narrative” may far outweigh practical progress, rendering counterinsurgency even more non-linear and unpredictable than before. The counterinsurgent, not the insurgent, may initiate the conflict and represent the forces of revolutionary change. The economic relationship between insurgent and population may be diametrically opposed to classical theory. And insurgent tactics, based on exploiting the propaganda effects of urban bombing, may invalidate some classical tactics and render others, like patrolling, counterproductive under some circumstances. Thus, field evidence suggests, classical theory is necessary but not sufficient for success against contemporary insurgencies…””

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