“Pragmatis​m”, French “Home Health Aid (HHA)” to Quadripleg​y & All That Jazz! – A Message of Hope-! — Written 07/23/12

For Your Entertainment (FYE)!  ;+)

 

“The Intouchables (French: Intouchables, which translates literally as Untouchable) is a French film directed by Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano. In just nine weeks after its release in France on 2 November 2011 it became the second most successful French film of all time (in number of viewers) in the French box office, behind the 2008 film Welcome to the Sticks.

The feel-good dramatic comedy has become a cultural phenomenon in France where it was voted the cultural event of 2011 with 52% votes.

It is based on the book “You Changed My Life” by Abdel Sellou.”

 

“The movie relates the development of the improbable friendship between Philippe, a wealthy tetraplegic, and Driss, a young and poor man from the ghettos, who is hired as his live-in carer.

The film begins at night in Paris. Driss is driving Philippe’s Maserati Quattroporte at full speed, with Philippe in the front passenger’s seat. They are soon chased by the police. “I bet you 100 euros I shake them off,” Driss tells his passenger. When they are caught, Driss, unfazed, doubles his bet with Philippe, convinced they will get an escort. In order to get away with his speeding, Driss claims the tetraplegic Philippe must be urgently driven to the emergency room; Philippe pretends to have a stroke and the fooled police eventually escort them to the hospital. The two men are jubilant. As the police leave them at the hospital Driss says “Now let me take care of it,” and they drive off.

The story of the two men is then told as a flashback, which occupies most of the film.

Philippe, a rich tetraplegic who owns a luxurious Parisian mansion, is interviewing, along with his assistant Magalie, to recruit a live-in carer to help him. Driss, a candidate, has no ambitions to get hired. He is just there to get a signature showing he was interviewed and rejected in order to continue to receive his welfare benefits. He is extremely casual and shamelessly flirts with Magalie. He is told to come back the next morning to get his signed letter. Driss goes back to the tiny flat that he shares with his extended family in a bleak Parisian suburb. His aunt, exasperated from not hearing from him for six months, orders him to leave the flat.

The next day, Driss returns to Philippe’s mansion and learns to his surprise that he is on a trial period for the live-in carer job. He learns the extent of Philippe’s disability and then accompanies Philippe in every moment of his life, discovering with astonishment a completely different lifestyle. A friend of Philippe’s reveals Driss’s criminal record which includes six months in jail for robbery. Philippe states he does not care about Driss’s past as long as he does his current job properly.

Over time, Driss and Philippe become closer. Driss dutifully takes care of his boss, who frequently suffers from phantom pain. Philippe discloses to Driss that he became disabled following a paragliding accident and that his wife died without bearing children.

Gradually, Philippe is led by Driss to put some order in his private life, including being more strict with his adopted daughter Elisa, who behaves like a spoiled child with the staff. Driss discovers modern art, opera, and art, and even takes up painting.

For Philippe’s birthday, a private concert of classical music is performed in his living room. At first very reluctant, Driss is led by Philippe to listen more carefully to the music and opens up to Philippe’s music. Driss then plays the music he likes to Philippe (Earth, Wind & Fire).

Driss discovers that Philippe has a purely epistolary relationship with a woman called Eleonore, who lives in Dunkirk. Driss encourages him to meet her but Philippe fears her reaction when she discovers his disability. Driss eventually convinces Philippe to talk to Eleonore on the phone. Philippe agrees with Driss to send a photo of him in a wheelchair to her, but he hesitates and asks his aide, Yvonne, to send a picture of him as he was before his accident. A date between Eleonore and Philippe is agreed. At the last minute Philippe is too scared to meet Eleonore and leaves with Yvonne before Eleonore arrives. Philippe then calls Driss and invites him to travel with him in his private jet for a paragliding weekend. Philippe gives Driss an envelope containing 11,000 euros, the amount he was able to get for Driss’s painting, which he sold to one of his friends by saying it was from an up-and-coming artist.

Adama, the younger brother of Driss, who is in trouble with a gang, takes refuge in Philippe’s mansion. Driss opens up to Philippe about his family and his past. Philippe recognizes’s Driss’s need to support his family and advises him, who “may not want to push a wheelchair all his life”, to seek work elsewhere.

Driss returns to his suburbs, joining his friends, and manages to help his little brother. Due to his new professional experience, he lands a job in a transport company. In the meantime Philippe has hired carers to replace Driss, but he isn’t happy with any of them. His morale is very low and he stops taking care of himself. Yvonne becomes worried and contacts Driss, who arrives and decides to drive Philippe in the Maserati, which brings the story back to the first scene of the film, the police chase. After they have eluded the police, Driss takes Philippe straight to the seaside. They arrive at a restaurant with a great view of the ocean. Driss suddenly leaves the table and says good luck to Philippe for his lunch date. Philippe does not understand, but a few seconds later Eleonore arrives. Philippe looks outside and sees Driss through the window, smiling at him.”

 

“Pragmatism is a philosophical tradition centered on the linking of practice and theory. It describes a process where theory is extracted from practice, and applied back to practice to form what is called intelligent practice. Important positions characteristic of pragmatism include instrumentalism, radical empiricism, verificationism, conceptual relativity, and fallibilism. There is general consensus among pragmatists that philosophy should take the methods and insights of modern science into account.  Charles Sanders Peirce (and his pragmatic maxim) deserves most of the credit for pragmatism, along with later twentieth century contributors William James and John Dewey.

Pragmatism enjoyed renewed attention after W. V. O. Quine and Wilfrid Sellars used a revised pragmatism to criticize logical positivism in the 1960s. Another brand of pragmatism, known sometimes as neopragmatism, gained influence through Richard Rorty, the most influential of the late 20th-century pragmatists. Contemporary pragmatism may be broadly divided into a strict analytic tradition and a “neo-classical” pragmatism (such as Susan Haack) that adheres to the work of Peirce, James, and Dewey. The word pragmatism derives from Greek πρᾶγμα (pragma), “deed, act”,[3] which comes from πράσσω (prassō), “to pass over, to practise, to achieve”.”

 

“Tetraplegia, also known as quadriplegia, is paralysis caused by illness or injury to a human that results in the partial or total loss of use of all their limbs and torso; paraplegia is similar but does not affect the arms. The loss is usually sensory and motor, which means that both sensation and control are lost.”

 

“François Cluzet (born 21 September 1955) is a French film and theatre actor, best known in the English-speaking world for starring in the 2006 French film “Tell No One”, based on the novel of the same name by the American author Harlan Coben. He won the 2007 César Award for Best Actor for his role as Dr Alexandre Beck in the film.”

 

“Omar Sy (born 20 January 1978) is a French film actor, best known for his duo with Fred Testot, Omar et Fred, and for his role in The Intouchables, written and directed by Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano, which became the second highest grossing French film of all time in the French box office.[1] He received the César Award for Best Actor on 24 February 2012 for his role in The Intouchables.

Sy was born in Trappes, France. His father is Senegalese and his mother is from Mauritius.”

 

Resources

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intouchables

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pragmatism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pragmatic_maxim

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetraplegia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%C3%A7ois_Cluzet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omar_Sy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maserati_Quattroporte

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth,_Wind_%26_Fire

http://www.amazon.com/You-Changed-Life-Abdel-Sellou/dp/160286182X

http://weinsteinco.com/sites/the-intouchables/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaumont_Film_Company

http://www.palacecinemas.com.au/movies/theintouchables/

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/entertainment/movie-reviews/english/The-Intouchables/movie-review/14821471.cms

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASSEDIC

https://www.cms.gov/Center/Provider-Type/Home-Health-Agency-HHA-Center.html?redirect=/center/hha.asp

http://www.citytowninfo.com/employment/home-health-aides

http://healthcareers.about.com/od/alliedmedicalprofiles/p/Home-Health-Aide-Careers-How-To-Become-A-Home-Health-Care-Aide.htm

 

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